DESIGNING A KID'S BUNK ROOM

When there is a will, there’s always a way, right! And most often achieving the will takes lots of exploration and problem solving. This is exactly how things went with the bunk room design at the Mount Valley Project.

Early on, months before any site work had even started on the project the clients decided how each of the five bedrooms in the house would be used. One of which was designated for a bunk room for sleep-overs with cousins.

Ideally the clients wanted two double beds with two twins above. When it came down to actually designing the space, the room they had chosen for the bunk room was too small and not laid out in a way with the doors and window placement that would accommodate bunks. 

From there, we went from room to room, on paper, doing preliminary sketches to see if any of the other rooms were configured in such away that would work. We landed on one but it would require a lot of finessing, and this meant that we had to reallocate what we originally thought would be both the girls’ and boys’ bedrooms.

OPTION A

Keeping egress in mind, (emergency exit, though at least one accessible window in case of fire) we set to work to see what we could come up with. Because of the proportion of the room, and door locations, the only real place for the bunk beds was on the window wall. Trying to achieve the clients wish for the bed sizes, and the requirements of egress, we pushed the twin beds forward and aligned the edge of them with the full beds below. Doing this allowed for us to create a channel, or free space between the upper beds and wall. This positioned the full beds well below the 44” distance from finish floor for egress.

BUNK ROOM PERSPECTIVE PLAN

BUNK WALL PERSPECTIVE

OPTION B

Even though the design of Option A checked all the boxes for the clients’ wish list, the architect on the project cautioned us saying that he didn’t believe that it would pass code with egress requirements. We went back to the drawing board. This time we explored trundle bed designs with built-in framing to give it cozy bunk room feel. We also included similar features like bookshelves, and lighting similar to what we had done in the Option A.

TRUNDLE BED PERSPECTIVE PLAN

TRUNDLE BED PERSPECTIVE PLAN WITH TRUNDLES PULLED-OUT

TRUNDLE BEDS PERSPECIVE

TRUNDLE BED PERSPECTIVE

OPTION B WITH CURTAINS

To add to the cozy feel, we also proposed incorporating curtains within the design.

TRUNDLE BED PERSPECTIVE WITH CURTAINS

TRUNDLE BED PERSPECTIVE WITH CURTAINS

OPTION C

With Option C, we explored the idea of two, side-by-side platforms with twin mattresses, storage below, and deep shelves and lighting between the beds.

SIDE-BY-SIDE PLATFORM BEDS - PLAN VIEW

SIDE-BY-SIDE PLATFORM BEDS - PERSPECTIVE

SIDE-BY-SIDE PLATFORM BEDS - PERSPECTIVE

OPTION C WITH CURTAINS

Again, to add to the cozy feel, we also proposed incorporating curtains within the design.

SIDE-BYSIDE PLATFORM BEDS PERSPECTIVE

SIDE-BYSIDE PLATFORM BEDS PERSPECTIVE

OPTION D

After mulling over all the design options, the clients decided that the only way to truly get what they wanted was to eliminate one of the windows in the bedroom, to open up more possibilities of making the bunks work. Fortunately the exterior wall of this bedroom is located on the side of the house that’s less prominent. The decision was made early enough during framing that the change didn’t require having to later come back and do a patch job on the exterior.

So back to the drawing board we went and this is what we came up with….

BUNK ROOM - PERSPECTIVE PLAN

BUNK ROOM PERSPECTIVE

BUNK ROOM PERSPECTIVE

PROGRESS PHOTOS

I’m happy to say that in the end the clients got what they were wishing for. Here are some progress photos from the job site.

BUNK ROOM BEDS

BUNK ROOM BEDS

BUNK ROOM BEDS

BUNK ROOM BEDS

BUBK ROOM BEDS

BUNK ROOM BEDS AND BOOK CASE

BUNK ROOM STAIRS TO TOP BUNK

THE TAKE AWAY

  • Good design is about exploration. In the world of custom homes, no two projects are alike so the design process becomes even more important. Be sure to allow both time and budget for trouble shooting and exploration of space so it can be customized to meet your needs and design vision.

  • Feeling stuck? Let’s work together! We can help you get the most out of your spaces, by customizing them to meet your needs and vision, no matter where you live. To learn more about Tami Faulkner Design, go here. For inquires go here.

To see more about the Mount Valley Project, go here and follow the links.

Cheers!

Tami

PHOTO CREDIT: Jessica White Photography