BOXED BEAMS, EXPOSED BEAMS & BARRELED ARCHES - MOUNT VALLEY PROJECT

No doubt about it, ceilings are typically the most under utilized surfaces for styling when it comes to interiors, unless we’re talking about more traditional architecture.

In the last many years though, even in the western states there has been a resurgence, and an echoing to the past, with adding custom millwork and architectural details, both on the walls and the ceilings.

ARCHITECTURAL DETAILS - FRONT ELEVATION

This is also true with the design work at the Mount Valley Project. A couple of weeks ago, when I was in Utah for a project meeting and a site visit, I got to see all the beautiful progress that’s been made since I was there last. 

Gorgeous architectural embellishments have been included both in the exterior and interior. Take a look at the cedar headers that grace the front door and the windows on the front elevation of the house.

FRONT DOOR - CEDAR HEADER DETAILS

FRONT DOOR - CEDAR HEADER DETAILS

FRONT DOOR - CEDAR HEADER DETAILS

WINDOWS - CEDAR HEADER DETAILS

FOYER

The architectural detail continues in selected places throughout the home, starting with the foyer where the barreled, arched door-ways are wrapped and trimmed in wood.

FOYER - JUST INSIDE FRONT DOOR

FOYER

KITCHEN NOOK

The kitchen nook has a boxed beam ceiling with diagonal boards in each of the quadrants, that create a diamond pattern.

KITCHEN NOOK

MASTER SUITE ENTRANCE

The barreled arch detail seen in the foyer, is repeated in the hallway entrance to the master suite.

MASTER SUITE HALLWAY ENTRANCE

MASTER BEDROOM

The master bedroom ceiling has exposed cross beams running the length of the space.

MASTER BEDROOM CEILING DETAIL

MASTER BEDROOM CEILING DETAIL

MASTER BEDROOM CEILING DETAIL

MASTER BEDROOM CEILING DETAIL

MASTER BEDROOM CEILING DETAIL

THE TAKE AWAY

  • Don’t over-look the visual impact that can be established with ceiling details. It’s these types of details that elevate a custom project.

  • Let’s talk about repetition. Starting from the front elevations of the house, there’s a combination of straight and curved lines that are repeated throughout the interior of the house. Neither one is over-done, but instead they work together to create visual rhythm, that looks thoughtful and intentional.

  • Consider too, how the architectural details on the exterior of the house provide a nice introduction to what’s going on in the interior. This is a must in good design. What’s seen on the outside should be reflected on the inside as well.

  • Just as important as repetition, is the use of contrast. Contrast is the magical ingredient that creates depth and interest. Notice how there is a mix of paint-grade and stained woods in the ceiling details shown. When it’s all said and done, the contrast between the two finishes will add a rich quality to the home.

Check back soon for project updates. - there is so much to see and to talk about. For more about the Mount Valley Project, go here, and from there it will lead you to more post.

Cheers!

Tami

PHOTO CREDIT: Jessica White Photography